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HONG KONG, China (November 5) – Anti-Dumping is a hot item in China itself too: a decade ago the Chinese producers quietly accepted the charges, but now they are not so easily convinced. A total loss of $80 million has been calculated by the Chinese Bureau of Fair Trade – which makes it a major […]

HONG KONG, China (November 5) – Anti-Dumping is a hot item in China itself too: a decade ago the Chinese producers quietly accepted the charges, but now they are not so easily convinced. A total loss of $80 million has been calculated by the Chinese Bureau of Fair Trade – which makes it a major concern for the government. Especially as the Chinese exports are soaring in a time of economical slump – so there will be more targeting by anti-dumping laws. According to Yu Yongda, the Chinese chief expert on anti-dumping in the Ministry of Commerce, the best move is to let the premier head the fair-trade commission. “Take a leaf out of the US system, where the president is directly responsible for the anti-dumping cases”. “When the premier tales the lead we can communicate of a higher level if very important cases come along, like the levies on Chinese TV’s in the US”. The issue of enlarging the staff to work on anti-dumping measures and counter-measures is also a concern for the Chinese: their 100 officials have to take on the 800(!) that do the same job in the US government alone. This will also be addressed soon, according to Mr. Yongda. China objects to the definition of it being a non-market economy, which enables the EU and the US to deny the costs of domestic production. Instead costs of production are calculated by means of a ‘surrogate’ country – to get to the so-called ‘normal value’ of Chinese production. And, so the Chinese claim, these ‘surrogate’ countries are not on a par with what is the actual cost-calculation in China which leads to tariffs that in some cases exceed a 100%. (MH) source: DAI YAN, Hong Kong Edition

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