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Prologo Rides To the Next Level

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Prologo saddles are riding to the next level in comfort with Active Density. This is the name of a new system, patented by Prologo. Active Density is combining two elements: a multiple-stiffness base design and a multiple-density padding structure. The multiple-stiffness base structure of the Active Density Prologo saddle comes from the variable thickness and […]

Prologo Rides To the Next Level

Prologo saddles are riding to the next level in comfort with Active Density. This is the name of a new system, patented by Prologo. Active Density is combining two elements: a multiple-stiffness base design and a multiple-density padding structure.

The multiple-stiffness base structure of the Active Density Prologo saddle comes from the variable thickness and the special ‘fish bone’ design in the central area. It results in more stiffness in the back and the front part where there are the rail inserts and where it is necessary to keep the saddle straight and stable. Next to that there’s less stiffness in the central zone in order to have a much better comfort and flexibility.

The multiple-density feature of the new Active Density Prologo saddles means that there are 3 different densities on one saddle. This unique feature means that there’s hi-density on the rear area of the saddle (seating zone); medium-density on the central zone (perineal area) and low-density towards the front (nose).

Two Prologo Active Density saddles are available: the Nago Evo (semi-round saddle, 280 x 134 mm) and the Scratch Pro (round saddle, 276 x 134 mm).

Next to the Active Density features, these saddles also have another important technical characteristic called ‘Skinny Nose Design’. This is the result of ergonomic and biomechanic studies and tests done in 2007/2008 by Prologo. Skynny Nose is re-defining the design of the nose and the opening area of the seating zone of the saddle, increasing the space for the legs of the cyclist. It brings better pedal strokes, avoiding the movement/sliding forward of the cyclist.

Photo Prologo

 

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