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China’s Carbon Testing Facilities Swamped

Laws & Regulations

BEIJING, China – The two by the Chinese government approved carbon testing facilities in Guangzhou and Jiangsu are both swamped with product to be tested. Recently the Chinese implemented the policy to have all carbon products destined for export tested. As it stands now, it is not possible

China’s Carbon Testing Facilities Swamped

BEIJING, China – The two by the Chinese government approved carbon testing facilities in Guangzhou and Jiangsu are both swamped with product to be tested. Recently the Chinese implemented the policy to have all carbon products destined for export tested. As it stands now, it is not possible to stick to this new policy.

The capacity of the bureaus in Guangzhou and Jiangsu that come with the impressive names: ‘Light Industrial Product Laboratory of Inspection & Quarantine Technical Center of Guandong (or Jiangsu), Entry-Exit Inspection & Quarantine Bureau’ is not enough to obtain approval prior to export.

According to Bike Europe’s sources working within the Chinese industry the sheer volume of products just swamps the two facilities as samples of all new bike products for export should be submitted to either bureau for test.

Because of the sheer volume of products, a de-facto arrangement exists where only certain items are submitted, on an often annual basis, money changes hands and those items jump to the head of the test-queue.

Sample products are required to be regular production models, not enhanced for testing in any way. But our Chinese sources heard anecdotal instances where the test samples are special ‘one-offs’ built purely to pass a critical test. How often this occurs is hard to say.

It is also said that the two Chinese test centres only test to the outdated GB 3565 – 2005/ISO 4210, 1996 standards, both superceeded by the tougher EN1781 standard over the past 2 years.

These sources state that buyers should insist on proper test reports for products prior to shipping. “This will maybe cause the lower ranks of suppliers to improve their quality far more than Government intervention which, in China, is often sidestepped.”

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