News Article

Americans Turn Away from Bike Shops

Sales & Trends

ALLENTOWN, USA – In the past twelve years the average number of visits to bike shops in the United States is down across the board. This is one of the results of the American Bicyclist Study conducted by the Gluskin Townley Group on the American retail market.

Americans Turn Away from Bike Shops
The number of visits made to a bike shop dropped 24 percent from nearly 10 visits per year in 2000 to 7 visits per year in 2012.

Gluskin’s market study shows an ominous future for the IBD channel in the U.S. Since the year 2000 the average number of visits to IBDs dropped one full visit from 3 to 2 visits annually.

A bigger problem could arise from the number of visits made to a bike shop by enthusiasts. This figure dropped 24 percent from nearly 10 visits per year in 2000 to 7 visits per year in 2012,” said Elliot Gluskin, managing partner of the Gluskin Townley Group.

Understand changes in the market
“The changes in the behavior of the American bicycling consumer are profound, and it is important for the bicycle industry, including suppliers and retailers to understand that the changes are already here, in the market place today.”

“Another important change relates to the total number of adult bicycle owners which increased only 2 percent from 24.8 million in 2000 to 25.3 million in 2012. This growth of just 531,000 adult bicycle owners was driven by an increase in the number of infrequent bicyclists with the lowest in overall miles ridden. The top three clusters, enthusiasts, moving ups and casuals declined between three and nine percent in the number of adult bicycle owners during the period.”

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