News Article

Taichung Bike Week 2015: Business as Usual

Shows & Events

TAICHUNG, Taiwan – This year’s Taichung Bike Week attracted some 5,000 industry people including product managers and many distributors. It’s not a high profile trade show. Nevertheless, it fulfils a leading role in the annual product development and specification cycle, which has proved to be essential for the bike industry for years.

Taichung Bike Week 2015: Business as Usual
“This is an OEM trade show and I am determined to keep it that way,” says show initiator and co-organizer Steve Fenton.

The Taichung Bike Week is different from all other bicycle trade shows. It is not only spread out over four Taichung hotels, the Tempus, the Evergreen, the Splendor, and the Millennium Vee, plus hundreds of meetings and presentations in factories, offices, hotels and restaurants spread over the city, it is also solely for the bicycle component brands to introduce their new products to OEM customers.

Presentations for Asian distributors

The show is supposed to be open to bicycle product managers and suppliers. However some companies, like Belgian Ridley and Eddy Merckx Cycles took the opportunity to present their new product range to mainly Asian distributors. “After the hectic autumn shows the informal and easy Taichung Bike Week is a great opportunity to show the new models and discus market developments with our distributors, especially here in Asia,” is the explanation for the company’s clear presence in Taichung by Ridley’s European Sales Manager Maik Geletneky. And Ridley was not the only one following this strategy.

More than 400 exhibitors

“We want to maintain the integrity of the show. This is an OEM trade show and I am determined to keep it that way,” says show initiator and co-organizer Steve Fenton. “After some years with huge growth, the Taichung Bike Week has reached its cruising altitude. This results in approximately 247 brands exhibiting in the Splendor, another 100 in the Evergreen and some 60 in the Tempus hotel.”

When talking to the exhibitors and looking around on the show floor, the main growth comes from visiting distributors and not from product managers anymore, but this doesn’t result in jammed packed corridors yet.

Click here to read the full report in the digital edition of Bike Europe.

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