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Tension In The Straits?

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TAIPEI, Taiwan (March 30) – The recent adoption by the Chinese government of the so-called anti-secession law has stirred up large number of Taiwanese. Basically, the law expresses the fact the People’s Republic of China gives itself permission to use ‘non-peaceful’ means to stop Taiwan moving towards independence. This in itself is no news – […]

TAIPEI, Taiwan (March 30) – The recent adoption by the Chinese government of the so-called anti-secession law has stirred up large number of Taiwanese. Basically, the law expresses the fact the People’s Republic of China gives itself permission to use ‘non-peaceful’ means to stop Taiwan moving towards independence. This in itself is no news – China has been striving to engulf Taiwan since the country was founded in 1949. What is new, is that China has now made it possible to use force – which was in fact always the case. The new law gives this a flair of legal-ness.
China has not bothered to seek advise from the UN, or check it’s new law against International laws or treaties. The US has expressed its feelings on the new law, it called it ‘unhelpful’ in the process of keeping the region stable.
But how imminent is the threat? Judging by the Easter weekend demonstrations one would think very – judging by the visit of Taiwanese Kwo Min Tang members to China it is an entirely different matter. The Kwo Min Tang, who once ruled the whole of China, when defeated fled to Formosa (now Taiwan) and ruled for 50 years – only to be replaced by the current president, Chen Shui-bian in the 2000 elections. The KMT visit to China is welcomed by the Chinese, as a sign of ‘cross-Strait’ friendship – in Taiwan this is seen entirely different, as the KMT are the political opposition of the president. What makes the timing of the Chinese law extra interesting, is the fact that in April the annual Han Kuang war games will take place. In Han Kuang, the Taiwanese test and demonstrate their state-of-the art defence force. But for the 270.000 protestors in Taipei it is clear that Taiwan wants to remain what it is: for all but the word, an independent nation. (MH)

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