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One Third of EU Importers Stopped Sourcing E-Bikes from China

Laws & Regulations

GAND, Belgium – To what extent the registration and the imposition of provisional dumping duties on the import of electric bicycles from China is harmful to import companies has recently been investigated by the Collective of European Importers of Electric Bicycles. It brings to light that 33% of all importers have stopped their e-bike imports from China and have not found an alternative solution.

One Third of EU Importers Stopped Sourcing E-Bikes from China
Damage to e-bike importers is reported as ‘significant and diverse to 65 companies, employing more than 1,000 people’. – Photo Shutterstock

The investigation on the impact of the registration of e-bike imports from China as well as the imposition of provisional dumping duties has been held by the European branch of the Light Electric Vehicle Association (LEVA-EU) on behalf of the Importers Collective. In a statement which was published yesterday LEVA-EU details that impact. Next to that the Association’s statement claims that it assessed various “incongruities in the European Commission’s Regulation of 18 July” in which the provisional dumping duties were announced.

Impact of provisional dumping duties

After the July 18 imposition of provisional dumping duties LEVA-EU carried out an Internet survey about possible injury caused by the proceeding to importing companies. LEVA-EU says “72 companies have completed the survey of which 65 (= 90%) confirm that the proceeding is causing actual damage to their business. The reported damage is significant and diverse:

  • Almost 42% is short of product to sell, in the height of the season;
  • 39% state that they already had to increase the price of their products;
  • 37.5% have suffered financial loss since the initiation of the dumping proceeding;
  • 33% have stopped import of electric bikes from China and have not found an alternative solution;
  • 30.6% state that their company will have to close down if retro-active collection is imposed;
  • 21% will not continue if definitive duties are imposed;
  • Almost 21% had to lay off staff.”

On this damage caused to importers LEVA-EU concludes “According to the Commission, the EU Industry currently consists of 37 companies. It is difficult to understand how stated damage to 65 companies, employing more than 1,000 people can be so simply dismissed by the Commission with the cursory understatement that final duties “could have an adverse effect on a number of mainly small importers”. Furthermore, the damage is occurring now, while the proceeding is ongoing and the accused have not been found guilty yet.”

Importers want hearing

LEVA-EU’s statement on behalf of the Importers Collective also digs deep in the European Commission’s Regulation of 18 July which, according to the Association, holds various discrepancies. Furthermore it says “The Collective is continuing its fight against this case. The group has requested a hearing with the Hearing Officer with a view to addressing the infringement of their right to defence in this and previous Regulations. Furthermore, the Collective is awaiting a decision on the admissibility of the lawsuit initiated against the European Commission.”

The complete LEVA-EU statement is available for download below.

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